Suddenly I'm a Santorum supporter

Feb 27 2012 Published by under [Politics]

Alright, I promise I'll back off the politics after this... for a bit. However, it is a dominant feature of the lives of most people in the US right now because, well, you can't interact with any news-bearing medium without being assaulted by the latest politico-gossip.

It's so dominant that it even came up in conversation with my Dad the other day. I'll confess that I have an aversion to discussing politics with my Dad but not for any particularly good reason. He's generally right-leaning on issues of finance, but luckily left leaning on social issues. Nevertheless, as he gets older and migrates towards that state when people stop caring whether they might offend someone by what they say, part of me is waiting for him to take an indefensible stance on some social issue. So far this hasn't happened but I can't help the feeling of unease I get when the conversation shifts to politics.

So last night I braced myself when the GOP primaries came up and cringed when he said casually "I'm hoping Santorum is the GOP candidate". All of a sudden I saw my fears being born out in front of me, leaving me puzzled as to how any non-religious, non-fanatical individual could throw support behind such insanity. I think he saw me recoil because he followed up with "If Santorum goes to the general election, he'll be the Mondale of this generation. It'll force the GOP to take a step back, regroup and re-evaluate where they have gotten themselves to at this point. It'll be the death blow for the vocal Tea Party faction because if the GOP wants to regain relevance, they are going to have to realize the the country doesn't want right wing extremism."

Well played, Dad. Well played.

Up to now I had been considering what would be the least bad option for a GOP candidate but perhaps the most bad option is, in fact, the best option for the country. The idea of Santorum parading around the country this summer talking about "values" still makes me want to vomit, but if the result is a landslide in November that forces a GOP do-over, I can carry a barf bag around with me for a few months.

Now if you'll excuse me, I need to go order a few dozen of these.

15 responses so far

  • anon says:

    Supporting the worst of the lot, no matter what the circumstance, is never a good idea. I mean, look what happened when Dubya got the nomination. I don't think Santorum has a chance of getting the nomination anyway. Even with all 14 or 15 people voting in the primary, he will never get it.

  • postdoc mom says:

    Both of my very liberal parents are registered republicans so they can vote in the republican primary. They usually go with the lesser of the evils though.

    I understand you're dad's approach, but the thought of Santorum going to the general election and having even a slight chance of winning makes me REALLY scared. I finally live in a state that has an early enough primary to "count" but I just don't know if I can go in a check a ballot box with Santorum's name... maybe folks here can convince me otherwise.

  • DrugMonkey says:

    Remember, Dubya *was* the middle-road, nonscary, Establishment GOP option...

  • proflikesubstance says:

    Remember, Dubya *was* the middle-road, nonscary, Establishment GOP option...

    Exactly. Santorum is so unpalatable to the vast majority of Americans, I simply can't see him garnering even Mondale-level support in November.

  • chall says:

    you knwo that people are crazy, right? In that that they do really odd things.... and that's why I would be tempted to agree with "go for the craziest man in the race since no one will vote for him" but in the back of my head is the nagging that "some people will vote for whomever GOP has since they *hate* the current president". No reasoning I'm afraid. And I am afraid.

    (maybe stockpiling things that will go illegeal if Santorum wins; birthcontrol, critical books on Bible and religion, feministic views, women's right to vote....)

  • Bashir says:

    I'm skeptical that a Santorum loss in the general will lead to any changes in the GOP. It seems that they're just as likely to double down. And agree with chall's sentiment. Plenty of people will vote GOP no matter who they nominate. It's not going to be a blowout.

  • Ink says:

    Thank goodness for the back of that t-shirt...

  • I'm for Santorum in the primary. I don't think he can last through the debates with Obama without showing the country his true colors.

  • Hermitage says:

    But if Santorum wins, he will get a SS detail and I will no longer be able to say I want him to GDIAF without getting a visit from the Dudes in Black...

  • becca says:

    Pretty much the only way Santroum will be a Mondale is if he goes allapocalyptic nutso on us- he confesses he wants to aid Israel in a nuclear war, fight all Israeli enemies in the middle east at once, and that he wants this solely to bring about Jesus coming back. He is probably crazy enough to believe it, but he's probably not stupid enough to say it, and until he does people aren't going to be scared enough. At least, I still have some modicum of hope that the threat of the end of the world, for real, via nuclear annihilation still scares people. But then, people voted for G W "let's make more nukes but not pronounce them correctly" Bush, so I may be overly optimistic.

    On the other hand, there's a good argument to be made that the most likely outcome of Santorum winning the nomination is a huge shift in the Overton window, followed by a 54/45 Obama win, and an erosion of reproductive rights and increase in religious rabidity by the Elmer Gantry politicians of our time.

  • HFM says:

    I agree with Becca. I'm not sure Santorum will win - but I don't think it would be a Mondale blowout, either. There are enough people out there who will vote for anything with an R by its name (the 27% Keyes voters), and add to that the people who would vote for the Unabomber rather than a black liberal with a foreign name, and the people who will reflexively vote against the incumbent, and the people who were singing along to "bomb bomb Iran", and the people who sincerely miss the Mad Men era...FSM help us all, they're probably approaching a majority.

    Even if he doesn't win, he's already shifting the Overton window. Seriously, the man got up and said JFK's willingness to put the Constitution over his religion made him want to vomit, and he scarcely got an eyeroll from the mainstream press. I'm not sure I want that lunatic in the news for the next year, even if he does herd the independents back to Obama.

  • Adjunctorium says:

    Oh man. If that chucklehead were nominated, Arizona -- home to the 8th-largest city in the nation -- would vote him in by a landslide. Remember: you can't fix stupid, and just now the crazies appear to outnumber the sane folks.

    It's just too scary.

  • proflikesubstance says:

    Common, Ink. Did you think I hit my head to heard last night?

    I think we're seeing a lot of Democrat hate being thrown around by a vocal minority and that an appauling candidate like Santorum would get buried. Not just because his views belong in the 15oos, but because the more light that gets shined on him, the more he's gonna stink. By Nov., he'll be like the leftover fish you forgot in the back of the fridge for 5 months and kept wondering why your house smells like the Gordon's Fisherman took a dump in the basement.

  • drugmonkey says:

    becca is spot on correct. Santorum is all about shifting the Overton Window. I beg all of you, make sure you include this in any possible comment you make on the topic. Otherwise it works. On the lefties as well as the right wingers. He exists only to make the slightly-less-insane seem normal.

    They are not.

  • Jim Thomerson says:

    I kind of agree with the initial assessment. However, I am really disappointed that we have a major political party, the Republicans, putting up candidates who are so unpresidential (to be kind). John Huntsman didn't look too bad, but was almost immediately eliminated. I think the situation says something frightening about the state of our nation.

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