Locked and loaded

This summer I will hit my three year anniversary of starting this position. A lot has happened, but a lot has changed. As a lab we have accomplished a significant amount and I have learned more than I imagined when I started this job.

For the first time, though, I really feel like we're in position to compete.

Starting the lab and getting the research going has been slower than I expected. Yes, we have gotten papers out, managed to find money here and there and even graduated a student, but all of that has felt like the warm up. Certainly part of that was my decision to embark on a few new lines of research that had to get established, but at this stage we have the data, we have the people and we're rolling.

0-60 in three years.

I'm not sure how long I expected it to take and each lab is going to face different challenges along the way, but I didn't expect to wait three years to finally feel like I can stop wondering if I am doing things right or stop questioning the research track we have set off on. I can point to the data now and say "I told you it would work". I can feel confident that I am not leading my trainees into the abyss. We set out with a plan and the data are paving the way.

Tis the Summer of Writing and there is much data to release unto the world.

11 responses so far

  • gerty-z says:

    YAY for making it from 0 to 60. Have fun releasing your data on the world over the summer! 🙂

  • GMP says:

    I am happy you feel you are on the upswing!

    But now a bit of Debbie Downer -- how's your fundraising situation?
    I know this is discipline-dependent, but in mine getting some federal grants as PI, preferably the sole PI, is key for tenure; I'd say everyone expects you to be able to publish, that's a given, but grant raising is tricky (the Dean looooves good fundraisers).

    I am impressed you graduated a student with a PhD in 3 years -- was he/she already a few years in before you started? If not, I am going to have a hard time from now believing life sciences folks that PhDs last forever...

  • proflikesubstance says:

    I know this is discipline-dependent, but in mine getting some federal grants as PI, preferably the sole PI, is key for tenure; I'd say everyone expects you to be able to publish, that's a given, but grant raising is tricky (the Dean looooves good fundraisers).

    Really? This is the first I'm hearing of this.

  • becca says:

    @GMP - yes, I always have a hard time believing people who I don't respect when they tell me things for which I have n = 1 counterexamples!

  • GMP says:

    becca -- huh? I think 3 years from start to finish is impressive in any field, and I do read enough biomed blogs that I am well aware that PhDs do in fact last long. Who is it that I don't respect?

  • DrugMonkey says:

    YEAh!!!!! Go PlS Lab!!!!!!

  • Dr. O says:

    I can feel confident that I am not leading my trainees into the abyss.

    It's good to hear that others have thought this. Some days, I feel like my research plans are solid. Others I wonder where the hell this road is heading.

  • Really? This is the first I'm hearing of this.

    Dude, you don't do snide very well.

  • namnezia says:

    Ahoy there, PLS!!

  • proflikesubstance says:

    Wait, am I on a boat or you? I'm confused.

  • [...] Summer came around and proposal rejections started to roll in. First one NSF proposal was bounced, then another. Funding rates are shit and the panels those proposals went to have seen a big upturn in proposals lately. I got involved in a summer outreach program, but despite the rejection and new work our momentum continued to build. [...]

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